Episode 25 - Tables Turned, Jay Interviews Me.

Here's an episode of my podcast, one wherein a long-time friend, Jay, interviews me and I share some about myself and Death to Stock. ---- When I was young, we’d take long car drives constantly. So, I grew up listening to radio. Me and my 3 sisters and mom, dad, yelling for us all to get our stuff around and get in the car. We’d scramble around and pack for the trip down to Florida or out West to Denver or Texas. I was lucky that my parents liked to camp, and we weren't afraid to drive far distances. We’d be 6 or 7 hours in, droning along through some mid-west city with nothing around but corn, driving straight for hours, and as the day drifted into night, you got used to the rhythm of the car, and we’d turn the dial for hunting for stories... And when you’re on the road, something just feels so right about it. As the landscape passed by, it was the voices which acted as the backdrop. Mostly it was Garrison Keiler, NPR, or muted and fuzzed country. My dad kept a CB, and sometimes he’d use it to check the traffic with truckers, or to hear the latest gossip of what their lives were like. See, with the spoken word, you still get to use your imagination. It allows us to fill in the blanks instead of see everything. Action movies of today want you to see it all, they want to thrill you with explosions and graphic imagery. But what horror writers know is that it’s not about what you put in, it’s about what you leave out. We imagine every trap that a character could fall in. When they narrowly escape, somewhere in our minds we see them fall to their doom. And it’s the creation in our minds that thrills us. These days the radio is taking a back seat. But podcasts are picking up in importance, it’s a resurgence. Because hearing a voice still does something for us. Still helps us with context for what we can’t see online, still get's our brain firing with creativity. It brings warmth and humanity into our technological world. Of course, in re-lisetning to this I felt bit vulnerable. Hearing yourself recorded is a mirror in it's own way, sort of like seeing a photo of yourself from the side, it just feels awkward. A long-time friend, Jay, interviews me on my podcast, and I share some about myself and about Death to Stock. Here I am, being recorded for my own podcast, wherein a long-time friend, Jay. Jay's Biz: http://unrealcollective.com

Here's an episode of my podcast, one wherein a long-time friend, Jay, interviews me and I share some about myself and Death to Stock. ---- When I was young, we’d take long car drives constantly. So, I grew up listening to radio. Me and my 3 sisters and mom, dad, yelling for us all to get our stuff around and get in the car. We’d scramble around and pack for the trip down to Florida or out West to Denver or Texas. I was lucky that my parents liked to camp, and we weren't afraid to drive far distances. We’d be 6 or 7 hours in, droning along through some mid-west city with nothing around but corn, driving straight for hours, and as the day drifted into night, you got used to the rhythm of the car, and we’d turn the dial for hunting for stories... And when you’re on the road, something just feels so right about it. As the landscape passed by, it was the voices which acted as the backdrop. Mostly it was Garrison Keiler, NPR, or muted and fuzzed country. My dad kept a CB, and sometimes he’d use it to check the traffic with truckers, or to hear the latest gossip of what their lives were like. See, with the spoken word, you still get to use your imagination. It allows us to fill in the blanks instead of see everything. Action movies of today want you to see it all, they want to thrill you with explosions and graphic imagery. But what horror writers know is that it’s not about what you put in, it’s about what you leave out. We imagine every trap that a character could fall in. When they narrowly escape, somewhere in our minds we see them fall to their doom. And it’s the creation in our minds that thrills us. These days the radio is taking a back seat. But podcasts are picking up in importance, it’s a resurgence. Because hearing a voice still does something for us. Still helps us with context for what we can’t see online, still get's our brain firing with creativity. It brings warmth and humanity into our technological world. Of course, in re-lisetning to this I felt bit vulnerable. Hearing yourself recorded is a mirror in it's own way, sort of like seeing a photo of yourself from the side, it just feels awkward. A long-time friend, Jay, interviews me on my podcast, and I share some about myself and about Death to Stock. Here I am, being recorded for my own podcast, wherein a long-time friend, Jay. Jay's Biz: http://unrealcollective.com
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